Cell surface carbohydrates and biological recognition proceedings of the ICN-UCLA symposium held at Keystone, Colorado, February 1977

Cover of: Cell surface carbohydrates and biological recognition |

Published by A. R. Liss in New York .

Written in English

Read online

Subjects:

  • Carbohydrates -- Congresses.,
  • Cellular recognition -- Congresses.,
  • Cell membranes -- Congresses.

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

Book details

Statementeditors, Vincent T. Marchesi ... [et al.].
SeriesProgress in clinical and biological research ;, v. 23
ContributionsMarchesi, Vincent T., ICN Pharmaceuticals, inc., University of California, Los Angeles.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQP701 .C34
The Physical Object
Paginationxiii, 674 p. :
Number of Pages674
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4714258M
ISBN 100845100238
LC Control Number78000417

Download Cell surface carbohydrates and biological recognition

The full text of this article hosted at is unavailable due to technical difficulties. Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (K), or click on a page image below to browse page by by: Complex carbohydrates coat the surfaces of cells and have the potential to carry the information necessary for cell–cell recognition.

Sugar‐specific receptors (lectins) are also present on cells, and can interact with sugars on apposing by: Cell surface carbohydrates and biological recognition: proceedings of the ICN-UCLA symposium held at Keystone, Colorado, February Author: Vincent T Marchesi ; ICN Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

; University of California, Los Angeles. Cell surface carbohydrates present information-rich binding sites for other molecules and act as "receptors" for biological agents as diverse as viruses, bacteria, toxins, and other cells.

This is illustrated well by studying the properties of circulating immune cells. The cells must often pass through the walls of capillaries as they hone in on a site of infection.

Cell-surface carbohydrates in cell recognition and response. Brandley BK, Schnaar RL. Complex carbohydrates coat the surfaces of cells and have the potential to carry the information necessary for cell-cell recognition. Sugar-specific receptors(lectins) are also present on cells, and can interact with sugars on by:   The recognition of extracellular and cell surface carbohydrates by specific carbohydrate-binding proteins, or lectins, is an important component of many biological processes.

This chapter reviews the main principles of protein-carbohydrate recognition with particular reference to examples where structural data are available and signaling is known to be important. polymers lubricate skeletal joints and participate in recognition and adhesion between cells.

on a cell surface, is an important carbohydrate in biology. Ø Recognition: Some carbohydrates on the surface of cell membrane have recognition role. Ø Protein trafficking: The glycosylation (attachment of sugar moieties to other macromolecules such as proteins) of proteins are used in protein-trafficking by the cell.

Carbohydrates in Drug Discovery and Development: Synthesis and Applications examines recent and notable developments in the synthesis, biology, therapeutic, and biomedical applications of carbohydrates, which is considered to be a highly promising area of research in the field of medicinal role in several important biological processes, notably energy storage, transport.

by considering the cell biology or molecular biology of cell-cell recognition and by discussion of the role of the cell surface, the interface at which most of these phenomena take place.

This text will be of interest to research workers in the fields of cell biology, molecular biology, immunology, developmental biology and pathology. T.J. Tolbert, C-H Wong, in Encyclopedia of Biological Chemistry (Second Edition), Abstract Carbohydrate chains play many important roles in biology, covering the surfaces of cells, mediating cell–cell recognition events, and forming major classes of biologically active molecules.

Reorganization of cell surface carbohydrates was later shown to be required for various activities of lectins on cells such as mitogenic stimulation and induction of apoptosis. The toxicity for animals of certain plant lectins has been recognized since the earliest days.

(Figure 2). The cell is tricked by the mimicry of the virus coat molecules, and the virus is able to enter the cell. Other recognition sites on the virus’s surface interact with the human immune system, prompting the body to produce antibodies.

Antibodies are made in response to the antigens (or proteins associated with invasive pathogens). To understand these processes, it will be necessary to isolate the specific molecules that mediate cellular recognition.

This task might be particularly difficult in the nervous system, where cellular interactions appear to be so complicated. Therefore, studies with simpler biological. Along with peripheral proteins, carbohydrates form specialized sites on the cell surface that allow cells to recognize each other.

These sites have unique patterns that allow for cell recognition, much the way that the facial features unique to each person allow individuals to recognize him or her.

Extrinsic Recognition is when the cell of one organism recognizes a cell from another organism, like when a mammalian cell detects a microorganism in the body. The molecules that complete this binding consist of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids, resulting in a variety of glycoproteins, lipoproteins, and glycolipoproteins.

[3]. Carbohydrates are important in cells as energy sources (glucose, glycogen, amylose), as markers of cellular identity (oligosaccharides on the surface of cells of multicellular organisms), as structural components (cellulose in plants), and as constituents of nucleotides (ribose in RNA, deoxyribose in DNA).

Membrane carbohydrates perform two main functions: participate in cell recognition and adhesion, either cell-cell signaling or cell-pathogen interactions, and they have a structural role as a physical barrier.

Blood groups are determined by cell surface carbohydrates of erythrocytes, and they also have the ability to trigger immunological. Recognition of Carbohydrates in Biological Systems, Part B: Specific Applications, MIE Vol, Y. Lee, Academic Press,pp., hard cover; find Sigma-Aldrich-Z MSDS, related peer-reviewed papers, technical documents, similar products & more at Sigma-Aldrich.

Lectins are proteins that recognize and bind specific carbohydrates found on the surfaces of cells. They play a role in interactions and communication between cells typically for recognition. Carbohydrates on the surface of one cell bind to the binding sites of lectins on the surface of another cell.

This volume covers the chemical and enzymatic synthesis of simple and complex carbohydrates and modern methods for the analysis of carbohydrate structure, and reviews the ways in which carbohydrates mediate binding to cells and subcellular targets such as.

In some cases, cell-surface lectins bind particular glycoproteins (e.g., asialoglycoproteins), whereas in other cases the carbohydrates of cell surface glycoproteins or glycolipids serve as sites of attachment for biologically active molecules that themselves are lectins (e.g.

carbohydrate-specific bacterial and plant toxins, or galectins). The carbohydrate pathogenesis moieties of cell surface glycoconjugates (glycoproteins and glycolipids) of mammals are the sites for intercellular recognition and for the regulatory molecular interactions such as interaction of complex carbohydrate with hormones or hepatic lectins.

The carbohydrate side chains of many complex carbohydrates play. Carbohydrates play a role in the biological membrane as recognition sites for other cells and molecules. They are able to bind with a protein in the membrane to form A.

glycoproteins. phospholipids. transmembrane proteins. lipid proteins. plasma bilayer. _____ proteins are embedded in biological membranes while _____ proteins are associated with surface regions of biological membranes.

Integral; peripheral Carbohydrates play a role in the biological membrane as recognition sites for other cells and molecules. However, a second main function arises from the facilitation of biomolecule recognition. Covalently attached carbohydrates that "decorate" the surface of glycoproteins or glycolipids provide new binding sites for interactions with other biomolecules.

Hence glycosylation allows for cell:cell, cell:protein, or protein:protein interactions. @article{osti_, title = {Carbohydrates, proteins, cell surfaces, and the biochemistry of pathogenesis}, author = {Albersheim, P and Anderson-Prouty, A J}, abstractNote = {General plant resistance to pathogenic attack by a myriad of microorganisms, viruses, nematodes, and insects are reviewed.

Specifically discussed are: The role of the cell wall and wall-degrading enzymes in infective. topics, as well as the recent book Lectins (Chapman & Hall, London).

This is Shar-on’s fifth article for Scientific American. Carbohydrates in Cell Recognition Telltale surface sugars enable cells to identify and interact with one another.

New drugs aimed at those carbohydrates could stop infection and inflammation by Nathan Sharon and. topics, as well as the recent book Lectins (Chapman & Hall, London). This is Shar-onÕs Þfth article for Scientific American.

Carbohydrates in Cell Recognition Telltale surface sugars enable cells to identify and interact with one another. New drugs aimed at those carbohydrates could stop infection and inßammation by Nathan Sharon and Halina.

The cell is tricked by the mimicry of the virus coat molecules, and the virus is able to enter the cell. Other recognition sites on the virus’s surface interact with the human immune system, prompting the body to produce antibodies.

Antibodies are made in response to the antigens (or proteins associated with invasive pathogens). Cell surface carbohydrates play important roles in cell recognition mechanisms. Recently, we provided evidence that particle selection by suspension-feeding bivalves can be mediated by interactions between carbohydrates associated with the particle surface and lectins present in mucus covering bivalve feeding organs.

In this study, we used lectins tagged with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC. Free Online Library: Microalgal cell surface carbohydrates as recognition sites for particle sorting in suspension-feeding bivalves.(Report) by "The Biological Bulletin"; Biological sciences Bacterial cell walls Physiological aspects Research Carbohydrates.

What function is served by the carbohydrates attached to cell-surface proteins. Choose one or more: ☺ protect the cell from mechanical and chemical damage ♡ establish a distinctive identity for cell-cell recognition O allow cells to establish and maintain their shape ♡ lubricate cells to keep them from sticking together o promote cell-cell adhesion.

The cell membrane (also known as the plasma membrane (PM) or cytoplasmic membrane, and historically referred to as the plasmalemma) is a biological membrane that separates the interior of all cells from the outside environment (the extracellular space) which protects the cell from its environment.

The cell membrane consists of a lipid bilayer, including cholesterols (a lipid component) that. Carbohydrates are the third major plasma membrane component. They are always on the cells’ exterior surface and are bound either to proteins (forming glycoproteins) or to lipids (forming glycolipids) ().

These carbohydrate chains may consist of 2–60 monosaccharide units and can be either straight or branched. Thus, both the processes of cellular mutation that affects the neoplastic cell and metastasis, involve a series of genetic changes that culminate in modifications in the pattern of several receptors and signaling molecules present on the cell surface.

Carbohydrates are biomolecules that have enormous potential for encoding biological information. Carbohydrates are the third major component of plasma membranes. They are always found on the exterior surface of cells and are bound either to proteins (forming glycoproteins) or to lipids (forming glycolipids) (Figure ).

These carbohydrate chains may consist of 2–60 monosaccharide units and can be either straight or branched. Notably, SPR analysis indicated that constitution of WTA determines the recognition by bacteriophage endolysins. Collectively, these findings provide detailed insight into Listeria cell wall-associated carbohydrates, and will guide further studies on the structure-function relationship of WTAs.

Cell surface receptors bind to signal molecules that cannot penetrate the cell membrane. What class of molecules are these signals. Ipt A. Lipids Carbohydrates Nucleic acids c. Proteins. Biological membranes are the boundaries that separate interiors of cells from their external environment.

The composition of biological membranes is complex; they are made of lipid bilayers [1, 2] with a wide array of components depending on the type, function and age of the cell [].Carbohydrates are a key structural feature of cell membranes.Carbohydrates in the membrane also play a role in cell recognition.

Carbohydrate chains carry a signature, like a flag, that says what organism a cell belongs to (host or intruder). Let's go back. Chapter 5 - Part 2. Cell Membrane Structure And Function - Function Of Plasma Membrane - What Is The Plasma Membrane - Duration: Whats Up D views.

30873 views Monday, November 16, 2020